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Early post‐treatment blood oxygenation level‐dependent responses to emotion processing associated with clinical response to pharmacological treatment in major depressive disorder

Authors: Rebecca J. Williams; Elliot C. Brown; Darren L. Clark; G. Bruce Pike; Rajamannar Ramasubbu;

Early post‐treatment blood oxygenation level‐dependent responses to emotion processing associated with clinical response to pharmacological treatment in major depressive disorder

Abstract

Abstract Introduction Pre‐treatment blood oxygenation level‐dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used for the early identification of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who later respond or fail to respond to medication. However, BOLD responses early after treatment initiation may offer insight into early neural changes associated with later clinical response. The present study evaluated both pre‐treatment and early post‐treatment fMRI responses to an emotion processing task, to further our understanding of neural changes associated with a successful response to pharmacological intervention. Methods MDD patients who responded (n = 22) and failed to respond (n = 12) after 8 weeks of treatment with either citalopram or quetiapine extended release, and healthy controls (n = 18) underwent two fMRI scans, baseline (pre‐treatment), and early post‐treatment (one week after treatment commencement). Participants completed an emotional face matching task at both scans. Results Using threshold‐free cluster enhancement (TFCE) and non‐parametric permutation testing, fMRI activation maps showed that after one week of treatment, responders demonstrated increased activation in the left parietal lobule, precentral gyrus, and bilateral insula (all P < 0.05 threshold‐free cluster enhancement (TFCE) family‐wise error‐corrected) to negative facial expressions. Non‐responders showed some small increases in the precentral gyrus, while controls showed no differences between scans. Compared to non‐responders, responders showed some increased activation in the superior parietal lobule and middle temporal gyrus at the post‐treatment scan. There were no group differences between responders, non‐responders, and controls at baseline. Conclusions One week after treatment commencement, BOLD signal changes in the parietal lobules, insula, and middle temporal gyrus were related to clinical response to pharmacological treatment.

Patients diagnosed MDD who later went on to respond to medication showed robust BOLD increases after one week of treatment to an emotion processing task. There were no differences between responders, non‐responders and healthy controls at baseline, indicating that BOLD fMRI can be used to identify mediating markers of treatment response.

Subjects by Vocabulary

Microsoft Academic Graph classification: medicine.medical_specialty Middle temporal gyrus Superior parietal lobule Brain mapping Internal medicine medicine medicine.diagnostic_test business.industry Precentral gyrus Inferior parietal lobule medicine.disease Cardiology Major depressive disorder business Functional magnetic resonance imaging Insula

Keywords

Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry, Citalopram, emotions, facial recognition, Behavioral Neuroscience, Humans, Original Research, Depressive Disorder, Major, major depressive disorder, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging, Facial Expression, brain mapping, antidepressant agents, RC321-571

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  • citations
    This is an alternative to the "Influence" indicator, which also reflects the overall/total impact of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network (diachronically).
    4
    popularity
    This indicator reflects the "current" impact/attention (the "hype") of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network.
    Top 10%
    influence
    This indicator reflects the overall/total impact of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network (diachronically).
    Average
    impulse
    This indicator reflects the initial momentum of an article directly after its publication, based on the underlying citation network.
    Average
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citations
This is an alternative to the "Influence" indicator, which also reflects the overall/total impact of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network (diachronically).
BIP!Citations provided by BIP!
popularity
This indicator reflects the "current" impact/attention (the "hype") of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network.
BIP!Popularity provided by BIP!
influence
This indicator reflects the overall/total impact of an article in the research community at large, based on the underlying citation network (diachronically).
BIP!Influence provided by BIP!
impulse
This indicator reflects the initial momentum of an article directly after its publication, based on the underlying citation network.
BIP!Impulse provided by BIP!
4
Top 10%
Average
Average
Green
gold
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